23. God, the Gospel, and Israel (Romans 11) | Michael Bouterse

23. God, the Gospel, and Israel (Romans 11)

Periodically in Thrive's Romans series, we're pausing to take up a "hot potato in Romans"—a topic that is culturally "hot" and hard to handle. In this talk, Michael Bouterse, Thrive Harbor's local director, addresses what Romans 11 says about Israel—a nation and people group never too far from political and theological controversy.

The story of Israel as told in the Old Testament revolves around God's promise, expressed and developed through multiple covenants, to one day bring salvation through a Messiah descended from Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. In Romans 11, Paul reveals that even though God has temporarily cast Israel aside due to their rejection of Jesus as Messiah, their being cast aside is neither total nor permanent. One day God will again take up His dealings with the Jewish people. He will regather them to their ancestral homeland, visit salvation upon a Jewish remnant, and, as a result, bring renewal to the entire world. These events belong to Israel's future, not because human beings are righteous, but because God is faithful; and for that reason, the future of Israel is one of the greatest exhibits in Scripture of God's lavish, unmerited grace. Passages cited (or alluded to) in this message include Genesis 3:14-15; 5:29; 12:2-3, 7; Deuteronomy 28:15, 20-21; 2 Samuel 7:12-16; Jeremiah 31:31-34; Ezekiel 11:19; 36:26; Isaiah 2:2-4; Matthew 1:1; Romans 11:1-32; Isaiah 11:11-12; Ezekiel 36:8-12; Zechariah 10:6-10; 14:4; 12:10; 13:1; and Genesis 45:1-7.

21. Predestination (Romans 9) | Michael Bouterse

21. Predestination (Romans 9)

Periodically in Thrive's Romans series, we're pausing to take up a "hot potato in Romans"—a topic that is culturally "hot" and hard to handle. In this talk, Michael Bouterse, Thrive Harbor's local director, takes on the topic of predestination based on Romans 9. Far more than just a doctrine to be grasped cognitively, predestination is both personal and practical, providing believers with a joy, assurance, and freedom, in that their salvation rests not on anything they are or have but on God's sovereign choice.

20. Romans 9-11: An Overview | David Baumgaertel

20. Romans 9-11: An Overview

David Baumgaertel, one of Thrive’s alums, launches Thrive into the next part of Romans by giving an overview of Romans 9-11, a critical section of Scripture that helps unlock a big picture of the entire Bible. In these chapters Paul demonstrates that God is perfectly righteous in how He has dealt with Jews and Gentiles, and that in different ways each group is the object of God’s mercy. Along with vindicating God’s righteousness, Paul also explains that there is a future for ethnic Israel, when one day the nation will recognize Jesus as Messiah. Passages cited (or alluded to) in this message include Romans 9-11; Genesis 12:3; and Malachi 1:2-3.

19. Romans 8:28-39 | Michael Bouterse

19. Romans 8:28-39

Michael Bouterse, Thrive Harbor's local director, closes out the last section of the climactic eighth chapter of Romans. In Romans 8:28-39 Paul reveals God's purpose for humanity: not conformity to a set of moral principles but to a person, Jesus Christ; His aim is for the very life of God to be woven into the warp and woof of our personalities. To this purpose God adds a promise of assurance that He will bring this reality to pass: that because of God's sovereignty and His sacrifice on the cross, nothing can separate us from His love. Passages cited (or alluded to) in this message include Romans 8:28-39; 8:18-22; 1 John 3:2; 2 Corinthians 3:18; 2 Timothy 3:5; Jeremiah 2:13; 1 John 4:8, 16; Luke 22:31-32; 1 Peter 1:3-7; and John 17:20-26.

18. Romans 8:18-27 | Dustin Polley

18. Romans 8:18-27

Dustin Polley, director of Thrive Kitsap (our sister ministry in Kitsap County), continues Thrive's ascent up the "Mount Everest" of Scripture, the glorious eighth chapter of Romans. In Romans 8:18-27 Paul announces that Christians await a glorious future, when at Christ's return God's people will be glorified, resulting not just in their renewal but in the renewal of all creation. Meanwhile, Christians, aided by the Holy Spirit, live in the tension of still experiencing suffering in this life, even as we long for the life to come.

16. Romans 8:1-11 | Jake Chambers

16. Romans 8:1-11

Jake Chambers, pastor and church planter of Local Church, kicks off the first of several weeks focused on the "Mount Everest" of Scripture—the magnificent eighth chapter of Romans. Romans 8 is one of the firmest statements in Scripture that in Christ we are free of condemnation, even though condemnation is exactly what we deserve! Yet because of what Jesus has done, God has liberated us from living under sin and set us free to live holy and abundant lives by the power of the Holy Spirit.

15. Jesus, Sex, and Secrets: Part 2 | Josh Mann

15. Jesus, Sex, and Secrets: Part 2

Periodically in Thrive's Romans series, we're pausing to take up a "hot potato in Romans"—a topic that is culturally "hot" and hard to handle. In this talk, Josh Mann, pastor at Fox Island Alliance Church, shares part of his powerful testimony to conclude a two-week miniseries on “Jesus, Sex, and Secrets” confronting pornography and sexual addiction.

14. Jesus, Sex, and Secrets: Part 1 | Michael Bouterse

14. Jesus, Sex, and Secrets: Part 1

Periodically in Thrive's Romans series, we're pausing to take up a "hot potato in Romans"—a topic that is culturally "hot" and hard to handle. In this talk, Michael Bouterse, Thrive Harbor's local director, opens a two-week miniseries on “Jesus, Sex, and Secrets” that confronts pornography and sexual addiction, springing out of Romans 6 and 7. This first talk deals with the devastation of porn, the wrong way to heal, and the right way to heal. Passages cited in this message include Romans 7:15, 19, 21, 24; Ephesians 5:3; 1 Thessalonians 4:3; 2 Corinthians 12:7; Luke 15:17-24, 30; 2 Corinthians 5:17, 21; 1 Corinthians 6:9-11; and Genesis 41:51.

13. Romans 7:14-25 | Michael Bouterse

13. Romans 7:14-25

How does God change us? How do believers grow amid the ongoing, ever-present battle with sin? Whereas Romans 6 gives Paul’s explanation of the right way to fight sin and seek change, Romans 7 gives the wrong way. It shows us that despite human beings’ inherent tendency to improve ourselves through our own effort, sin can’t be defeated through simply trying harder. Sanctification is God’s work, accomplished through the power of the Holy Spirit. Passages cited in this message include Romans 7:14-25; 1 John 1:8; Romans 6:17; Ephesians 2:1-3; 1 Timothy 1:8-9; Colossians 2:20-23; Romans 6:2, 11-13; and Galatians 2:20.

11. Romans 6 | David Shohradov

11. Romans 6

David Shohradov, one of Thrive's own, preaches on Romans 6, one of the Bible's great chapters about how the gospel changes us. Why should Christians no longer sin? Is it because of fear of punishment or to impress God? According to Romans 6, the answer is that dead men don't sin! When Jesus died, our sinful self died, meaning that we no longer have to do what sin tempts us to do. The result is freedom from the sin that seeks to bind us.

6. Romans 3:1-20 | Michael Bouterse

6. Romans 3:1-20

The first three chapters of Paul's letter to the Romans claim that all humanity is guilty and in need of the gospel. Already he has argued that religious people need the gospel (chapter 2) just as much as non-religious people (chapter 1). Now, to conclude his argument, Paul considers some challenges someone might make to his case, before driving that case home with a withering litany of truth about humanity's desperate state apart from Christ. Passages cited in this message include Romans 1:18-3:20.

2. Romans 1:18-32 | Michael Bouterse

2. Romans 1:18-32

Michael Bouterse, Thrive Harbor’s local director, continues Thrive's series on Romans by looking at the second half of Romans 1. Like a prosecuting attorney, Paul in 1:18-3:20 constructs an air-tight case that all humanity is guilty and in need of a savior. In this section, Paul first tells us why humanity is guilty, and secondly he shows us how God responds to our sin—by giving us over to the very sin we crave. (We apologize that the audio cuts out before the end of the message.)